Hanuman Films Blog

A proven track record of production success in Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam and across the Southeast Asia region

Exploring the old ‘Sihanouk Trail’ in Cambodia with Red Bull Media House

Hanuman recently looked after a major overland expedition for Red Bull Media House, the extreme sports specialists. For this trip they were following some competition mountain bikers, including Rebecca Rusch, the “Queen of Pain”, down the Ho Chi Minh Trail through Laos and onwards south down the ‘Sihanouk Trail’ in Cambodia.

Red Bull Crew in Cambodia

Red Bull Crew in Cambodia

2 mountain bikes, 5 dirt bikes, 8 4WDs, this was an expedition through some of the most remote parts of Cambodia. Crossing into Cambodia at Trapeang Kriel, the crew headed northwest to Siem Pang before crossing the Sekong River and surfing through the sand to Veun Sai. After a comfortable overnight in Ban Lung, they continued south to Koh Nhek, using the old ‘Death Highway’ from Lumphat. From there, they blasted through Sen Monorom on the new road before veering off to follow the old King’s Highway through the jungles of Kaoh Seima Protected Forest, one of the most beautiful roads in Cambodia.

A homemade bridge in Northeast Cambodia

A homemade bridge in Northeast Cambodia

All of this was captured on state-of-the-art Red Epic Dragon 6K cameras, that means 9X the pixels of an HD camera or one hell of a lot of memory. It should make for an epic endurance film through some of the most remote and beautiful parts of Indochina.

Filming the Red Bull mountain bikers on the Red Epic Dragon in Cambodia

Filming the Red Bull mountain bikers on the Red Epic Dragon in Cambodia

River Monsters Season 7 to premiere on Animal Planet on 5 April

Animal Planet’s top rated show, River Monsters, is returning for Season 7 in April, including an episode shot in Cambodia with Hanuman Films last year, “Mekong Mutilator”.

 


“Jeremy ventures to the Mekong River in Cambodia after receiving a disturbing report of a bloody attack by a toothy predator that has sliced clean through a young man’s testicle. The clues carry Jeremy to the largest natural lake in Southeast Asia where he ditches his rod for a native fishing custom and zones in on the deceivingly adorable freshwater pufferfish.”


http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/river-monsters/

Behind-the-Scenes with Hanuman Films on Top Gear Vietnam

Hanuman Films was selected as the partner for the BBC Top Gear Vietnam special in 2008 with Nick Ray tackling the role of Line Producer.

 

 

Top Gear is one of the BBC’s most popular programmes. The Vietnam special involved an epic bike journey from Saigon to Hanoi with Jeremy Clarkson on a Vespa, Richard Hammond on a Minsk and James May on a Honda Cub. After an epic journey passing through Dalat, Nha Trang, Hoi An and Hue, the boys jump a night train to Hanoi. The show climaxes with the conversion of the bikes into amphibious vehicles to explore Halong Bay. It was quite the James Bond experience filming with six speedboats and a helicopter to capture all the angles.


Hanuman Films ran the shoot on the ground and coordinated everything from filming permissions to motorbikes and amphibious with a crew of 15 production staff in Vietnam. The shoot was a great success and the show received rave reviews in the UK press and around the world.

Dragonair at Angkor Wat, the first major commercial at the temples of Angkor

Hanuman Films became the first local production company to organise a major international television commercial at the temples of Angkor with this Dragonair commercial.


Kulikar Sotho worked with Hong Kong-based Moviola Productions as Line Producer, taking responsibility for the entire production in Cambodia. Hanuman arranged all filming permissions, including the sensitive dragon dance shoot at Angkor Wat, and arranged all logistics, such as accommodation, transport and import/re-export of equipment. During the five-day shoot, Kulikar also acted as interpreter for the 15-strong production crew. The commercial covered four countries, Cambodia, Hong Kong, Japan and Taiwan, but, according to the Moviola crew, it was in Cambodia that things ran most smoothly.

Looking Back on Tomb Raider: 15 Years After the Circus Came to Town

In the first of our retrospective look backs on shoots we have hosted in Southeast Asia, we turn the clock back 15 years to the Millennium when Angelina Jolie, Daniel Craig and the Tomb Raider crew came to Angkor.

 


Tomb Raider was the first major Hollywood film to shoot in Cambodia since Peter O’Toole starred in Lord Jim in 1964. The Tomb Raider crew were all set to travel to China to film the Terracotta Army coming to life, when the sequence was pulled at the last minute, as it had already been featured in a Chinese movie. Cambodia was next on the list and Hanuman Films was chosen for scouting at Angkor. Following a successful scout with a full technical crew, Paramount British Pictures appointed Hanuman Films as their local servicing partner in the Kingdom of Cambodia. Our previous experience involved shooting the Lonely Planet TV Cambodia episode with Presenter Ian Wright and a crew of five!


Kulikar Sotho worked as Local Liason Manager, or Line Producer, arranging all filming permissions, script approval, temporary import/re-export of equipment, visas, accommodation, transport and catering for the production. Nick Ray worked as Location Manager on the film, selecting locations for the shoot, building a photographic inventory of the temples used in shooting, approving all sets or alterations to be made at each site and working with local authorities every step of the way to ensure this first sensitive shoot at Angkor passed without incident.


Hanuman Films also took responsibility for recruitment ofa large team of translators, hundreds of extras, site security and an army of labourers.


Tomb Raider premiered on June 15th 2001 at Mann’s Theatre in Los Angeles. Nick and Kulikar were both invited to the premiere and stayed with Producer Lloyd Levin.


Notable milestones passed during production included:

  1. Securing the support of the Council of Ministers for the project to go ahead, despite some high level objections;
  2. Obtaining permission to build a traditional floating village on the royal pond at Angkor Wat;
  3. Getting nine containers over the roads from hell in the middle of the wet season, taking five days for the trucks to cover just 320km;
  4. Juggling the shooting schedule around the state visit of President Jiang Zemin of China and King Norodom Sihanouk to Angkor;
  5. Arranging the safe arrival of 30 or so servicing vehicles from Thailand, another nightmare journey that required two army units to build bridges along the way.

Locations: Angkor Wat, Ta Prohm temple, Phnom Bakheng, East Gate of Angkor Thom, Bayon, Phnom Kulen


Actors: Angelina Jolie, Daniel Craig, hundreds of local extras, the temples of Angkor

The Last Reel Review in The Hollywood Reporter

Industry magazine The Hollywood Reporter gave The Last Reel an excellent review after THR writer Clarence Tsui watched the movie at the Singapore International Film Festival last month.

The Last Reel

The Last Reel


“Sotho Kulikar addresses Cambodia’s cinematic peaks and historical troughs through a family drama about a young woman’s rite of passage through filmmaking

With The Last Reel, Cambodian cinema’s resurgence as a filmmaking force continues apace with, again, some help from beyond Southeast Asia – or, specifically, Australia, from which the film’s screenwriter-producer, cinematographer, editor and soundtrack composer hail. But at the helm is a Cambodian director, and at its center a distinctly local story designed to address how different generations struggle with the country’s suppressed and still unresolved Khmer Rouge-inflicted traumas.

The cultural specificity of the tale is also given a universal touch, as Sotho Kulikar – who worked on the Cambodian shoot of Hollywood films like Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, and a rare female filmmaker in what remains a patriarchal society – conjures remarkable performances from her lead actresses in an attempt to reflect historical schisms through the tropes of rebellious-daughter family drama.

The Last Reel could be considered the fictional-feature take on themes broached in Cambodian documentaries securing widespread acclaim on the festival circuit in the past two years. With a nod to the issues brought to prominence by established auteur Rithy Panh‘s Oscar-nominated The Missing Picture and up-and-coming archivist-cum-directorDavey Chou‘s celebration of Khmer-language cinema in Golden Slumbers, Kulikar and her screenwriter Ian Masters (who wrote of being inspired by an exhibition curated by Chou) conjured a story in which a young woman rediscovers his parents’ buried pasts through an engagement with images flickering on screens in long-abandoned picture palaces. Offering a mix of humanistic drama and a celebration of the powers of cinema, The Last Reel‘s Asian stops – first Tokyo, then Singapore, and finally at home in Phnom Penh – will definitely be just a prologue to bookings beyond its nearby shores.

The character undergoing the film’s central rite of passage is Sophoun (Ma Rynet), who begins the film as a listless young college student whiling away her time as some kind of moll of her leather-jacketed, motorbike-cradling hoodlum boyfriend Veasna (Rous Mony, star of 2012 Venice entryRuin). All this seems to be a reaction against the tyranny at home, where she’s disparaged by her decorated-soldier father (Hun Sophy), and an arranged marriage into a prominent family and books about “moral conduct for women” await.

It’s during one of her escapades with Veasna that she first discovers cracks in her family, as she wanders around the disused cinema she frequents and discovers her mother’s photograph plastered across the wall. It’s at this point that she learns of how she’s not the first rebel in the family: the meek, middle-aged woman at home was actually once a famous actress, the star of a film made none other by the unassuming caretaker of the theater-turned-garage. When told the final reel of the retained film was lost during the Khmer Rouge years,Sophoun took it on herself to try and bring that movie – and her mother – to life, an attempt which turned out to reveal much more about the anguish suffered by all the jaded elders around her.

The Last Reel is obviously Kulikar’s gesture of the need to bring Cambodia and its cultural legacy alive – not just for the benefit of those nostalgic about their good old days, but also a new generation born after the 1990s and basically unaware (and uninterested) about the Khmer civilization’s halcyon days and how it’s all swept away within four years by Pol Pot and his murderous cadres. In this sense, The Last Reel’s trump card lies in its metatexuality, of introducing young hipsters to figures they barely know: playing the mother is actually Dy Saveth, an iconic figure in Cambodian cinema in the pre-Khmer Rouge times and one of the few actors who survived the pogroms (she was out of the country when the extremists took power in 1975, and went into exile until the 1990s). Meanwhile, cast in the vanquished-filmmaker role is Sok Sothun, a real-life director who lived through the purges and went on to study cinema in Moscow in the 1990s. (The derelict cinema shown on screen is the now-abandoned Prasat Meas theater in the city of Battambang.)

The Last Reel is beautifully shot, with Bonnie Elliott’s camerawork easing the film’s gradual relocation from the neon-lit, nocturnal urban frenzy in the beginning to poignant pastoralism towards the end, as the story draws to a close with a delicate homage to the traditional aesthetics of classical Khmer culture and cinema. But this is not just about mere reconciliation or putting ghosts to rest, Masters’ screenplay also harks to how the past doesn’t just haunt but actually lingers in a cycle, as the high-brass ruling Cambodia today are revealed to have just switched uniforms back in 1979, or when the unjust measures in the social system of the past – not just among the late 1970s killing fields, but further beyond to the underbelly of Cambodia’s glorious heyday – are still peddled around as norms.

Beneath the tranquility, a simmering fury abounds – an emotion burning brightly in performances all around, ranging from Rynet and Mony’s vivacity to the veterans’ internalized anger and self-disgust. The Last Reel is more like part of a new exciting beginning than the end, one foreign-assisted step (like the Paris-based Panh and Chou, whose films are largely financed by European funds) back to the consolidation of a national cinema in Cambodia.”

Venue: Singapore International Film Festival

Production company: Hanuman Films

Cast: Ma Rynet, Rous Mony, Dy Saveth, Hun Sophy

Director: Sotho Kulikar

Screenwriter: Ian Masters

Producers: Ian Masters, Sotho Kulikar, Murray Pope

Executive producers: Lloyd Levin, Sotho Tan, Nick Ray, Chris Wheeldon

Director of photography: Bonnie Elliott

Editor: Katie Flexman

Music: Christopher Elves

Casting director: Sithorn

In Khmer

 

The Last Reel homecoming premiere at the Cambodia International Film Festival

The homecoming premiere of The Last Reel was a big success on the opening night of the Cambodia International Film Festival at Major Cineplex, Aeon Mall, Phnom Penh.


The Last Reel Premiere CIFF 2014

The Last Reel Premiere Cambodia International Film Festival 2014


Many of The Last Reel team were there to enjoy the moment, including Director Sotho Kulikar, actors Ma Rynet (Sophoun), Dy Saveth (Srey Mom/Sothea), Sok Sothun (Vichea) and Rous Mony (Veasna), Writer/Producer Ian Masters; Producer Murray Pope and many more.


Ma Rynet scooped the CIFF Talent Award 2014 reflecting her commanding performance in The Last Reel. Meanwhile some of the team from the Tokyo International Film Festival and the Japan Foundation flew in to Cambodia especially to present The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar with her engraved Spirit of Asia Award, with the Japanese Ambassador on hand to welcome them in the kingdom. Two festivals and two awards for those involved in The Last Reel, what an achievement.


Minister of Information Khieu Kanharith at the Last Reel Premiere CIFF 2014 Khieu Kanharith

Minister of Information Khieu Kanharith at the Last Reel Premiere CIFF 2014 Khieu Kanharith

Our sincere thanks go out to everyone involved in making the Cambodia premiere a special night, including the Cambodia International Film Festival team, the organisers, the sponsors and all those who turned out in force to make it so memorable. Particular thanks to the Minister of Culture H.E. Phoeurng Sackona (pictured above with the The Last Reel team) and the Minister of Information H.E. Khieu Kanharith (pictured above) for attending the opening night. There were many other VIPs and faces from the filmmaking community there and we hope everyone enjoyed the film.


Our thanks to our supporters Sabay for some great photographs on the night and interviews will be coming soon with Sotho Kulikar and Ma Rynet. For more images from Sabay, visit their website: http://news.sabay.com.kh/article/155834

The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar Accepts the Spirit of Asia Award

The official Tokyo International Film Festival videos are now live on the Hanuman Films Youtube channel. See The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar deliver a moving acceptance speech dedicated to Cambodia and Cambodians everywhere as she accepts the Spirit of Asia Award by the Japan Foundation Asia Center.

 

The Cambodian premiere of The Last Reel will be at 18.00pm at the Major Cineplex, Aeon Mall, on Friday 5 December, the opening film of the Cambodian International Film Festival, but this is by invitation only.

There will be two more screenings for The Last Reel. 17.30pm on 9 December at Legend Cinema, Tuol Kork and 16.15pm on 10 December at Major Cineplex, Aeon Mall, both in Phnom Penh. Details on advance tickets will be announced by CIFF soon. Both screenings to be followed by a Q & A with award-winning Director Sotho Kulikar and selected cast members.

The Last Reel has a ‘deeply emotional impact’ on The Playlist on Indiewire

The debut feature film from Hanuman Films and Director Sotho Kulikar is described as “affecting and gripping” and “a passionate cri de coeur”.

The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar works with actors Ma Rynet (Sophoun) and Sok Sothun (Vichea) in the abandoned cinema

The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar works with actors Ma Rynet (Sophoun) and Sok Sothun (Vichea) in the abandoned cinema

“The debut film from Cambodian director Sotho Kulikar, “The Last Reel” starts shakily but adds nuance and layers as it progresses to become affecting and gripping by its closing section, something noted by the committee who gave it the “Spirit of Asia” award at the Tokyo International Film Festival. This is the second Cambodian film that we know of to use the history of the country’s pop cultural/filmmaking past to comment on both the devastation wrought by the Khmer Rouge, and the cathartic power of storytelling. The widely lauded documentary/personal history “The Missing Picture” is the other picture, while the documentary “Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten,” which plays at this year’s stacked DOC NYC fest and investigates the country’s relationship with rock ‘n’ roll, looks set to be a third entry into this mini-subgenre (and our attention was drawn to another — “Golden Slumbers” reviewed here). But “The Last Reel,” though heavily autobiographical, is not a documentary, and the unmistakably personal nature of its story allows it to become, by its close a passionate cri de coeur, and a lamentation for a period of cruelty and perverted ideology that scars, perhaps even maims, the collective Cambodian memory.

As simple fiction, the film flounders a little, especially initially when we are expected to invest in the rather empty-headed star cross’d romance between a young Cambodian girl and her no-good gang affiliated boyfriend. The snapshot it gives of current Cambodian attitudes to gender relations and familial duty is interesting, but the tale is an overfamiliar one, and the filmmaking, never terribly sophisticated, doesn’t give us much reason to suspect just what a stunning story Kulikar has up her sleeve. In fact, if it were our business to do so, we’d strongly urge her to make substantial cuts to this portion—essentially, she buries her fascinating lede under some not terribly interesting filler. And throughout the rest of the film, she only occasionally manages a true synthesis of the real story with the rather melodramatic turns the fictional overlay takes.

But no matter, because the real story that emerges, somehow all the more evocative for being told in glimpses, builds into a desperately moving, and surprising tale. A married, fragile ex-movie star, her overbearing husband, and the owner of the dilapidated cinema who pines for her, become entangled in a young girl’s desire to reshoot an ending to a currently unfinished film, and soon the secrets all three hide as to their roles and actions during the terror come to light. More about story than style, “The Last Reel” relates a personal, cross-generational tale of love and hate to the loss of cultural heritage and identity that occurred when Khmer Rouge outlawed moviemaking and destroyed a thriving national industry, and if only in its own last reel, it has both educational and deeply emotional impact.”

ខ្សែភាពយន្ត​ខ្មែរមួយ ឈ្នះ​​ពាន​ពី​ជប៉ុន

សែភាពយន្ត​​ខ្មែរ​រឿង “The Last Reel ឬ ដុំ​ហ្វីល​ចុង​ក្រោយ” របស់ អ្នកស្រី សុទ្ធោ គុល្លិការ បាន​ទទួល​ពាន​រង្វាន់​ពី​មហោស្រព​ភាពយន្ត​អន្តរជាតិ​មួយ​នៅ​ទី​ក្រុង Tokyo ប្រទេស​ជប៉ុន កាល​​ពី​ចុង​ខែ តុលា ឆ្នាំ ២០១៤​នេះ។

The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar accepts the prestigious Spirit of Asia Award at the Tokyo International Film Festival 2014

The Last Reel Director Sotho Kulikar accepts the prestigious Spirit of Asia Award at the Tokyo International Film Festival 2014


ពាន​ដែល​ខ្សែភាពយន្ត​​រឿង “The Last Reel ឬ ដុំ​ហ្វីល​ចុង​ក្រោយ” ទទួល​បាន​មាន​ឈ្មោះ​ថា ” ដួង​ព្រលឹង​អាស៊ី ឬ The Spirit of Asia “ ពី​មជ្ឈមណ្ឌល​មូលនិធិ​អាស៊ី​ជប៉ុន ​។ អ្នកស្រី សុទ្ធោ គុល្លិការ ដែល​អ្នក​ដឹក​នាំ​សម្ដែង និង​ ជា​ផលិតករ​នៃ ខ្សែភាពយន្ត​មួយ​នេះ​បាន​ឲ្យ​ដឹង​ថា មហោស្រព Tokyo International Film Festival 2014 បាន​ធ្វើ​តាំង​ពី​ថ្ងៃ​ទី ២៣ រហូត ដល់​ថ្ងៃ​ទី ៣១ ខែ តុលា ឆ្នាំ ២០១៤ កន្លង​ទៅ​នេះ ដោយ​នៅ​ក្នុង​នោះ​​ខ្សែភាពយន្ត ជាង ២០០ រឿង ​មក​ពី​តំបន់​អាស៊ី ត្រូវ​បាន​ដាក់​ចូល​រួម​ប្រកួត ប៉ុន្តែ ​គណៈកម្មការ​សម្រេច​ជ្រើសរើស​យក​តែ​ ៣០ រឿង ​ប៉ុណ្ណោះ មក​ចាក់​បញ្ចាំង​ប្រកួត។ ជាលទ្ធផល​​មាន​តែ ១១ រឿង​ប៉ុណ្ណោះ ដែល​ទទួល​ពានរង្វាន់​ក្នុង​កម្មវិធី​នេះ​ក្នុង​នោះ​ក៏​មាន​ខ្សែភាពយន្ត​​​​ខ្មែរ។

រឿង “The Last Reel ឬ ដុំ​ហ្វីល​ចុង​ក្រោយ” ដែល​​ទទួល​បាន​ពាន​រង្វាន់ “ដួង​ព្រលឹង​អាស៊ី ឬ The Spirit of Asia “ ជា​ខ្សែភាពយន្ត​ដែល​និយាយ​ពី មរតក​នៃ​ភាព​រន្ធត់ របស់​ក្រុម​គ្រួសារ​កម្ពុជា ក្នុង​របប​ខ្មែរ​ក្រហម និង ផល​ប៉ះពាល់​ពី​សម័យ​នោះ មក​សង្គម​កម្ពុជា សម័យ​ក្រោយៗ​ទៀត។ តារា​សម្ដែង​នៅ​ក្នុង​រឿង​នេះ មាន អ្នក​ស្រី ឌឺ សាវ៉េត កញ្ញា ម៉ារី ណែត និង លោក សុខ សុធន លោក ហ៊ុន សុភី និង តារា​សម្ដែង​មួយ​ចំនួន​ទៀត។

រឿង “The Last Reel ឬ ដុំ​ហ្វីល​ចុង​ក្រោយ” គឺ​ជា​ស្នាដៃ​លើក​​ដំបូង របស់​អ្នកស្រី សុទ្ធោ គុល្លិការ។ អ្នក​ស្រី​ថា ជោគជ័យ​ដែល ទទួល​បាន​នេះ គឺ​ជា​ កម្លាំង​ចិត្ត​ដ៏ធំ ក្នុង​ការ​ជំរុញ​ឲ្យ​អ្នក​ស្រី​ផលិត​ភាពយន្ត​បន្ត​ទៀត។

បើ​តាម​ការ​បញ្ជាក់​ពី​អ្នក​ដឹង​នាំ​រឿង​មួយ​នេះ រឿង”The Last Reel ឬ ដុំ​ហ្វីល​ចុង​ក្រោយ” នៅ​មិន​ទាន់​មាន​គម្រោង​​ដាក់​បញ្ចាំង​លក់​សំបុត្រ​តាម​រោងភាពយន្ត​នានា​​ក្នុង​ប្រទេស​កម្ពុជា​​នៅ​ឡើយ ប៉ុន្តែ​ខ្សែភាពយន្ត​មួយ​នេះ គ្រោង​នឹង​ចូល​រួម ក្នុង​មហោស្រព​ភាពយន្ត​កម្ពុជា ដែល​នឹង​ត្រូវ​ធ្វើ​នៅ​ថ្ងៃ​ទី ៥ រហូត​ដល់​ថ្ងៃ​ទី ១០ ខែ ធ្នូ ឆ្នាំ ២០១៤ ខាង​មុន​នេះ៕

mp3 indir oyun indir oyun oyna katılımsız indir hack oyun indir crack indir program indir indir izle oyunlar divx film indir tek link film indir